(215) 291-2968 Monday - Jan 18, 2021

SLEEP


  I have faith that Novem has started the new year healthy and fancy free! We hardly need research to tell us that sleep is important for optimal health and performance, but here is a friendly reminder. Sleep deprivation can have a negative effect on athletic performance, learning, memory, immunity, inflammation, glucose metabolism, and cause

 

I have faith that Novem has started the new year healthy and fancy free! We hardly need research to tell us that sleep is important for optimal health and performance, but here is a friendly reminder. Sleep deprivation can have a negative effect on athletic performance, learning, memory, immunity, inflammation, glucose metabolism, and cause you to eat a greater amount of calories throughout a day. Nutrition can have an affect on neurotransmitters that are involved in the sleep-wake cycle. There may be nutritional strategies that can help improve sleep rather than relying on pharmacological agents. To be honest, many of the studies in this area have been small and measure acute dietary affects on sleep rather than long term diet. Here is a little of what the current research is finding anyway. A high carb diet may result in a short sleep latency. Sleep latency in the amount of time it takes to actually fall asleep. A high protein diet has been found to improve sleep quality and a high fat diet reduces sleep time. A decrease in caloric intake may also disturb sleep quality. Tryptophan has been well studied and there is evidence that about 1 gram will improve sleep latency and subjective sleep quality. One gram of tryptophan is about 300 grams of turkey or 100 grams of pumpkin seeds. Melatonin has also been extensively studied but the evidence is inconclusive at this point and long-term effects are not well studied. Tart cherry juice contains high levels of melatonin and was found to improve subjective sleep quality and time during a two-week trial period.  There are many dietary supplements that claim to improve sleep quality, but the research is pretty shaky, especially for long-term health outcomes. Future research on chrononutrition, which studies the affect of nutrient timing on sleep quality, will give us a better idea of how our diet affects our sleep. It is likely that nutrient timing and macronutrient composition make a big difference on our perceived sleep quality and time. Until we known more about diet and sleep, unplug from that cell phone, create a routine, and breathe.  Sweet dreams, Novem!

 

Reference:

Halson, Shona. GSSI: Nutrition Interventions to Enhance Sleep. Sports Science Exchange (2013) Vol. 26, No. 116, 1-5.

Predefined Skins

Primary Color

Background Color

Example Patterns

demo demo demo demo demo demo demo demo demo demo